Throwback Thursday Pannier

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Well here’s a throwback for you. It’s a 1950’s era OO gauge Pannier. Today it has a retro sort of charm to it, with it’s cast body and basic chassis. Powered by an Triang XO3 motor through what looks like a 40:1 gear set, it still runs, and runs well. I found it sorting through some old, old, family bits and pieces and it was definitely in the ‘barn find’ category when I opened the box. Knowing that they were of negligible worth in today’s market I sat looking at it for a few minutes and then thought, wonder if it still works?

Why?

Just out of idle curiosity really, like many of my hobby associates I have an interest in how stuff works. (And, a license threatening interest in how fast too). I also like to know I can fix things and this was a challenge, does it work? Can I get it going?, can I improve it?

Well it stuttered and juddered into life, sparks literally flying from the wheels and pickups, both filthy. The pick up is one side only through an insulated wheel set, but these aren’t Romfords, I suspect they are Hamblings, whom at one time provided wheels and an accurate wheel press for quartering. I dusted the bodywork off, oiled the chassis, cleaned both the wheels and pickups, and watched it ‘run in’ again, possibly 40 years or so from last turning a wheel. It also provided me a bit of a throwback too, it was my late fathers, and even now twenty plus years passed, I still use some of his tools and equipment for modelling and working on cars and bikes.

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Quite the little time machine then, transporting me back to times working with my dad, learning how to do ‘stuff’. Perhaps as importantly, making errors and fixing them, getting over the frustration of something you’ve royally ‘porked’. On the ‘barn finds’ theme in twelve inches to the foot scale I’ve recently made such a discovery, and am patiently waiting to see if I can negotiate a deal on the car. Having learnt a lot of stuff from this hobby, some of which will help in restoration,

I wonder how many of today’s equivalent 57xx above, will be acting as similar time machines and learning experiences in thirty years time?

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2 Responses to Throwback Thursday Pannier

  1. I agree fully with that, Paul. There’s something hugely satisfying about finding an old model or piece of machinery and coaxing it back to life. The old Pannier might not have any intrinsic market value today, but as a wee link with yer old man she’s priceless. Keep her out as a wee study ornament or something! As an aside, I’m away out to bag a pair of Oxford 7-plankers. I’ll use your findings in the earlier post to help create a pair ofNCB internal users.

    Cheers.

    Dave.

  2. bawdsey says:

    Thanks Dave, the Pannier certainly brings back memories, including taking dads layout to Bury St Edmunds show in the back of a Commer Van. The layout was stored down one side, and the other side was taken up by a BSA Bantam. Whilst dad played trains at the exhibition, his mate was racing at Snetterton! George Dent also likes the Oxfords, he’s just done an NCB makeover recently on his blog http://georgedentmodelmaker.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/private-on-parade.html

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